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How Does the Abortion Pill Work?

The abortion pill (also known as medication abortion) actually consists of two pills: mifepristone and misoprostol.

 

Mifepristone is taken first. It cuts the supply of the hormone progesterone to the embryo, which is needed to maintain the pregnancy. Without a steady supply of progesterone, the embryo stops growing and eventually dies. Misoprostol is taken 24-48 hours later. This medication makes the uterus cramp and expel the fetus, which ends the pregnancy.

Ultrasound

How Late Can You Take the Abortion Pill? 

The abortion pill is only FDA-approved for up to 10 weeks from your last menstrual period[1]. If you take the abortion pill later on in your pregnancy, the risk of serious complications increases. You may need emergency surgery to stop heavy bleeding or complete the procedure if it fails or is incomplete.

Ultrasound

Abortion Pill Information in Eastern CT

When your pregnancy test comes back positive, it can be easy to panic. Don’t let fear make the final decision for you. Get the care and support you deserve at the Women's Center of Eastern Connecticut. We offer free pregnancy resources, so you can make an empowered decision for your unplanned pregnancy:  

 

  • Free pregnancy tests

  • Free ultrasounds

  • A safe, non-judgemental place to explore your pregnancy options and share what’s on your mind

 

Give us a call at (860) 576-8072 or request your free appointment today. All services are confidential and free of charge.

Please be aware that the Women's Center of Eastern Connecticut does not provide or refer for abortion services. 

Sources

  1. FDA. (2023, September 1). Questions and Answers on Mifeprex. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/drugs/postmarket-drug-safety-information-patients-and-providers/questions-and-answers-mifeprex   

  2. Public Act No. 22-19. Connecticut General Attorney. (2022, July 1). https://cga.ct.gov/2022/ACT/PA/PDF/2022PA-00019-R00HB-05414-PA.PDF    

  3. Breborowicz, G. (2001, January). Limits of fetal viability and its enhancement. U.S. National Library of Medicine. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11753511/ 

  4. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. (2023, March 23). Mifeprex (Mifepristone). U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/drugs/postmarket-drug-safety-information-patients-and-providers/mifeprex-mifepristone-information

If you find yourself experiencing any of the above pregnancy symptoms, please reach out to the Women's Center to schedule an appointment for your free pregnancy test and free ultrasound. 

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